Fashion and fitness brand Addison Bay experiments with pop-ups to grow its customer base

Addison Bay is a multi-brand active fashion company curating the best assortment of fashion forward activewear in one place. As a busy woman on the go, founder and CEO Marguerite Adzick wanted to develop a one-stop space where activewear goes beyond time spent at the gym, where fashion-forward doesn’t mean less function and looking good is feeling good. NRF had a chance to talk with Adzick while the company was in Washington, D.C., to learn about the launch and growth of Addison Bay.

Addison Bay is an ecommerce company based in Philadelphia. What brings you to Washington, D.C.?

Our roots are in Philadelphia, but we have felt an incredible amount of support from the Washington, D.C. / Northern Virginia areas since we launched in September of 2018. It felt right for D.C. to be our first destination to host a pop-up outside of the Philadelphia area. We chose to host a cocktail and shopping party at The Wharf and a three-day pop-up at Union Market, based on feedback from several friends who live in the area. We’re really looking forward to hosting more events in D.C. and connecting with more consumers.  

Addison Bay CEO Marguerite Adzick headshot
Marguerite Adzick, founder & CEO of Addison Bay, launched the company in September of 2018.

What has been most rewarding and challenging in launching Addison Bay?

The most rewarding thing is that I can lead by example and hopefully be a good role model for my daughter and nieces — I am really trying to “do it all,” in terms of being a hands-on mom and a successful founder of a company. I want to show them that “the sky is the limit” and give them the confidence to take risks and really go for it in their own lives someday.

The most challenging part of launching Addison Bay is the daily roller coaster — there are extreme highs and extreme lows. Every day is truly a different day and navigating the ups and downs can be really difficult.

Based on your experience as a retail entrepreneur and former marketing employee with Lilly Pulitzer, what is your perspective on the future of retail?

We believe the modern woman is constantly on the go, multi-tasking, and has less time for leisurely shopping. Based on my experience, I believe that ecommerce is the wave of the future. With minimal time on our hands, women will primarily be checking out online. Specifically, I think the mobile experience is going to become more used — with the addition of new technology, the mobile experience is becoming easier and quicker. That being said, bricks-and-mortar is definitely important, and we will continue to explore opportunities in that space.

What goals do you have for Addison Bay in the next three to five years?

In the next three to five years, we plan to launch and grow a private label business. We have rolled out exclusives with some of the labels we carry already, but I definitely see us creating an Addison Bay private label once we fully understand who our consumer is and what she still needs from us. We’re also planning to open a bricks-and-mortar flagship location, ideally in Center City Philadelphia — we love having face time with our consumers, and we would love to eventually be a multi-channel retail business.

What would you like consumers to know about your brand?

In the first seven months of business, we’ve gotten a really strong grasp on who the Addison Bay girl is and I’m so proud of the community of women we have cultivated. So who is the AB girl? The AB girl is confident and feels a sense of belonging. She’s loyal to her family, cherished friends and familiar places. Her thoughtful appearance, great attitude and friendly demeanor make her a favorite in any environment. Her dynamic personality makes her a friend that others trust and seek advice from. Most days are spent juggling multiple activities, as she is determined and very driven. When it comes to her wardrobe, the AB girl is more concerned with how something makes her feel than how she is perceived socially, or by others. Something either feels right or it doesn’t. Luckily, she has inherent style, or is at least in the know when it comes to what people are wearing. Her go-to wardrobe effortlessly straddles the fine line between performance and everyday style, and has no problem accommodating her energetic life.

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