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Breakfast Burned

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Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It’s the one
nutrition rule that has remained impervious to change. So why is it,
according to the latest research from NPD Group, that some 31 million
U.S. consumers are scrambling out the door to work or school without
eggs, toast or cereal?

Excuses run the gamut --
from they weren’t hungry/thirsty or didn’t feel
like eating or drinking to they didn’t have time and were too
busy. (The good news is that no one is blaming the family dog for this
one.)

NPD’s Morning
MealScape 2011 study, which delves into the situational factors and
attitudinal drivers impacting consumers’ food and beverage
choices in the morning, finds that males, ages 18 to 34, have the
highest incidence of skipping (28 percent) whereas those adults 55 and
older have the lowest incidence of skipping (11 percent for males ages
55 and older; and 10 percent for females in this age range). Among
children, the incidence of skipping -- individuals who are up, but
don’t eat or drink anything in the morning -- increases as
children age, with those age 13 to 17 having the highest incidence (14
percent) of skipping.

Among those who do eat
breakfast, three-fourths have their morning meals, snacks and beverages
in their home. Approximately one in five consume foods and beverages in
the morning both at home and away from home on a typical day, and 14
percent of individuals have their morning meals away from home.

With 31 million people
skipping breakfast each day there is a significant opportunity for food
and beverage marketers to reach these consumers,” says Dori
Hickey, director, product management at NPD and author of Morning
MealScape 2011. “Marketing messages emphasizing the
importance of having a morning meal should be age- and gender-specific
in order to increase their effectiveness. To convert teens, a
two-pronged approach may be necessary -- one that appeals directly to
teenagers; the other to provide strategies for parents of
teens.”

Sounds like opportunity
knocking for the likes of Bob Evans, Waffle House and Panera Bread.

Percent of
Adults, By Gender, Who Skip Breakfast
Males  Females
18-34 years old 28% 18%
35-54 years old 18 13
55+ years old 11  10
Source:
The NPD Group/Morning MealScape 2011

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